What Kind of Influence?

I thought this was interesting. It’s amazing that 2 men born on the same day could have such opposite effects on society. We may not have quite the sphere of influence that these men had, but our lives will influence otheres around us as well. What kind of influence do you want to have?

 

Abraham Lincoln and Charles Darwin were born on the exact same day, February 12, 1809, but their lives had opposite effects.

 

Lincoln is best known for freeing millions of slaves by issuing the Emancipation Proclamation, claiming all men are created equal.

 

Darwin’s theory of evolution claims men are not equal as some are more evolved, and has been used by totalitarian regimes to enslave millions.

 

Lincoln’s last act in office was to put on all National Coin the motto, “In God We Trust.”

 

Darwin’s theory has been used to deny of God.

 

Lincoln, the first Republican President, addressed the Indiana Regiment, March 17, 1865:

 

“Whenever I hear anyone arguing for slavery, I feel a strong impulse to see it tried on him personally.”

 

On April 6, 1859, Lincoln wrote to H.L. Pierce:

 

“This is a world of compensation; and he who would be no slave must consent to have no slave. Those who deny freedom to others deserve it not for themselves, and under a just God, cannot long retain it.”

 

After the Battle of Antietam, Lincoln told his Cabinet, September 22, 1862, as reported Treasury Secretary Salmon Portland Chase:

 

“The time for the annunciation of the emancipation policy can no longer be delayed. Public sentiment will sustain it, many of my warmest friends and supporters demand it, and I have promised God that I will do it.”

 

When asked by Secretary Chase to explain, Lincoln replied:

 

“I made a solemn vow before God, that if General Lee were driven back from Pennsylvania, I would crown the result by the declaration of freedom to the slaves.”

 

In his Second Inaugural, March 4, 1865, just 45 days before his assassination, Lincoln stated:

 

“If we shall suppose that American slavery is one of those offenses which, in the providence of God, must needs come, but which, having continued through His appointed time, He now wills to remove,

 

and that He gives to both North and South this terrible war as the woe due to those by whom the offense came,

 

shall we discern therein any departure from those divine attributes which the believers in a living God always ascribe to Him?…

 

If God will that it continue until all the wealth piled by the bondsmen’s two hundred and fifty years of unrequited toil shall be sunk, and until every drop of blood drawn with the lash shall be paid by another drawn with the sword, as was said three thousand years ago, so still it must be said

 

‘the judgments of the Lord are true and righteous altogether.'”

 

Lincoln stated in his Second Annual Message, December 1, 1862:

 

“In giving freedom to the slave, we assure freedom to the free…We shall nobly save – or meanly lose – the last, best hope of earth…The way is plain…which if followed the world will forever applaud and God must forever bless.”

 

In his Gettysburg Address, November 19, 1863, Lincoln stated:

 

“Fourscore and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.”

 

In contrast, Darwin published his “Origin of Species,” 1859, and in 1871, his “Descent of Man,” in which he wrote:

 

“With savages, the weak in body or mind are soon eliminated…

 

We civilized men, on the other hand…build asylums for the imbecile, the maimed and the sick…Thus the weak members propagate their kind.

 

No one who had attended to the breeding of domestic animals will doubt that this must be highly injurious to the race of man…Hardly anyone is so ignorant as to allow his worst animals to breed…

 

Civilized races of man will almost certainly exterminate and replace the savage races throughout the world…

 

The break between man and his nearest allies will then be wider, for it will intervene between man in a more civilized state, as we may hope, even than the Caucasian, and some ape as low as a baboon, instead of as now between the negro or Australian and the gorilla.”

 

Darwin’s concept justified the racism of the Dred Scott v Sanford Decision, 1856, written by Chief Justice Roger B. Taney, who was appointed by Democrat President Andrew Jackson:

 

“Slaves had for more than a century before been regarded as beings of an inferior order…so far inferior, that they had no rights which the white man was bound to respect; and that the Negro might justly and lawfully be reduced to slavery for his benefit.”

 

Darwin’s theory influenced Margaret Sanger, who promoted “eugenics” and “forced sterilization” to eliminate inferior races. Sanger founded a 501(c)3 called Planned Parenthood.

 

Margaret Sanger, in her book Pivot of Civilization, 1922, called for the:

 

“Elimination of ‘human weeds’…overrunning the human garden; for the cessation of ‘charity’ because it prolonged the lives of the unfit; for the segregation of ‘morons, misfits, and the maladjusted’; and for the sterilization of genetically inferior races.”

 

Sanger advised Nazi Party member Ernst Rudin, father of “racial hygiene,” who educated on the dangers of hereditary defectives.

 

Nazi’s considered the German “Aryan” race as “ubermensch,” supermen, being more advanced in the supposed human evolution.

 

When Germany’s economy fell, Hitler’s national healthcare plan of socialized medicine had to cut expenses, such as keeping alive handicapped, insane, chronically ill, elderly and those with dementia. They were considered “lebensunwertes leben” – life unworthy of life, and sent to the gas chambers.

 

Soon criminals, convicts, street bums, beggars and gypsies, considered “leeches” on the State, met the same fate.

 

Eventually, in a perverted effort to rid the human gene pool of less evolved “untermensch”- under mankind, Hitler’s immoral plan sent 6 million Jews, along with millions of others, to the holocaust gas chambers and ovens.

 

Joseph Stalin followed suit in the Soviet Union, exterminating through intentional famines, forced labor and executions an estimated 27 million “inferior” Ukrainians.

 

Mao Zedong followed this example with his atheistic Communist Party policies causing an estimated 80 million deaths in China.

 

These not too distant genocides resemble the Islamic teaching that Jews are from apes, Christians are from swine, and Kafir infidels are inferior “dhimmi” – not equal to believing Muslim males, which led to a sharia political system that in 1,400 years contributed to an estimated 270 million deaths.

 

History reveals that the consequences can be frightful if a government adopts Darwin’s utilitarian value of human life and departs from President Lincoln’s belief, “that all men are created equal.”

Advertisements

Got Milk?

Got milk? Got pasteurized milk? You might want to thank God and Louis Pasteur, who died on this day in 1895. I like the quote of Pasteur at the bottom of this American minute below. I am so thankful to know that there is a loving Creator and that my life is not just a series of mere random events!

American Minute with Bill Federer

September 28

He developed vaccines for rabies and anthrax, revolutionized medicine
with his germ theory of disease, and laid the foundation for the
control of tuberculosis, cholera, diphtheria and tetanus.

While Dean of the Faculty of Sciences at Lille University in France,
he developed the process of “Pasteurization” of milk.

This was Louis Pasteur, who died SEPTEMBER 28, 1895.

President Eisenhower wrote January 8, 1954:

“Pasteurization of milk has prevented countless epidemics and saved
thousands of lives.”

President Johnson stated April 7, 1966:

“Years ago Louis Pasteur said, ‘I hold the unconquerable belief that
science and peace will triumph over ignorance and war; that nations
will come together not to destroy, but to construct; and that the
future belongs to those who accomplish most for humanity.'”

President George H.W. Bush stated February 13, 1989:

“You know, Louis Pasteur once said: ‘Chance favors only the prepared
mind.’…For America to be prepared for the future, our children must
be educated.”

Dr. Louis Pasteur wrote:

The more I study nature, the more I stand amazed at the work of the
Creator…

There is something in the depths of our souls which tells us that the
world may be more than a mere combination of events.”

Napoleon Was Right About That One!

American Minute with Bill Federer

April 30

The size of the U.S. doubled APRIL 30, 1803, with the Louisiana
Purchase.

Nearly a million square miles, at less than three cents an acre – it
was the greatest land bargain in history!

President Thomas Jefferson commented on it in his Second Inaugural
Address, March 4, 1805:

“I know that the acquisition of Louisiana has been disapproved by
some from a candid apprehension that the enlargement of our territory
would endanger the union, but who can limit the extent to which the
federative principle may operate effectively?”

For fifteen million dollars, France sold its land west of the
Mississippi, called the Louisiana Territory, because Napoleon
Bonaparte needed money quickly for his military campaigns.

Napoleon fought in Europe, Egypt and Russia, but was finally exiled
to the island of Elba.

Napoleon returned to rule France again for 100 days, but after losing
at Waterloo in 1815 he was banished to the tiny island of St. Helena
in the South Atlantic, where he commented to General Count de
Montholon:

“Alexander, Caesar, Charlemagne, and myself founded empires; but upon
what foundation did we rest the creations of our genius? Upon force!

But Jesus Christ founded His upon love; and at this hour millions of
men would die for Him.”

What Would Happen If A President Said This Today?

American Minute with Bill Federer

March 30

During the Civil War, after issuing his Emancipation Proclamation,
President Abraham Lincoln set a National Day of Humiliation, Fasting
and Prayer, MARCH 30, 1863, stating:

“It is the duty of nations…to own their dependence upon the
overruling power of God, to confess their sins…with assured hope
that genuine repentance will lead to mercy…

The awful calamity of civil war…may be but a punishment inflicted
upon us for our presumptuous sins.”

Lincoln continued:

“We have been the recipients of the choicest bounties of Heaven…

We have grown in numbers, wealth and power as no other nation has
ever grown.

But we have forgotten God.

We have forgotten the gracious Hand which preserved us in peace, and
multiplied and enriched and strengthened us; and we have vainly
imagined, in the deceitfulness of our hearts, that all these blessings
were produced by some superior wisdom and virtue of our own.”

Lincoln concluded:

“Intoxicated with unbroken success, we have become too
self-sufficient to feel the necessity of redeeming and preserving
grace, too proud to pray to the God that made us!

It behooves us then to humble ourselves before the offended Power, to
confess our national sins and to pray for…forgiveness.”

Better Than A Moon Walk!

images

American Minute with Bill Federer

July 20

“One small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind,” stated Neil
Armstrong, JULY 20, 1969, as he became the first man to walk on the
moon.

He, along with Colonel Aldrin, landed their lunar module, the
“Eagle,” and spent a total of 21 hours and 37 minutes on the moon’s
surface before redocking with the command ship “Columbia.”

Addressing a joint session of Congress, September 16, 1969, Commander
Neil Armstrong stated:

“To those of you who have advocated looking high we owe our sincere
gratitude, for you have granted us the opportunity to see some of the
grandest views of the Creator.”

Years later, April 21, 1972, Astronauts Charles Duke and John Young
also explored the moon’s surface during Apollo 16’s mission to the
rugged highlands of the moon’s Descartes region.

On June 22, 1996, Astronaut Charles Duke spoke of this experience at
a Prayer Rally during the State’s Republican Convention in Lila
Cockrell Theatre, San Antonio, Texas:

“I used to say I could live ten thousand years and never have an
experience as thrilling as walking on the moon.

But the excitement and satisfaction of that walk doesn’t begin to
compare with my walk with Jesus, a walk that lasts forever.”

 

Memorial Day

Although we are not planning on going to a Memorial Day service, or visiting a national cemetery or seeing a parade, I have been thinking a lot about the men and women that have fought and sacrficed their lives that we might have the privileges we have today in our country. If you are reading this blog and have a loved one that gave their life in service to our country, I offer a big, heartfelt THANK YOU.  May we never forget those who layed down their lives to benefit so many.

memorial_day_at_arlington_national_cemetery[1]

“Under God” Pastor Dies

I’m sure most of you are familiar with the expression, “You learn something new every day.”  Well, I learned something new today.  There was a time in U.S. history when the words “under God” were not part of the pledge of the allegiance. The man who was credited with helping to get these words into our pledge of allegiance died on Thanksgiving day.  I’m thankful for men such as George Docherty with a conviction and strong desire to see God honored.  Here is the brief history I read about George Docherty and “under God.”

ALEXANDRIA, Pa. – The Rev. George M. Docherty, credited with helping to push Congress to insert the phrase “under God” into the Pledge of Allegiance, has died at 97.

 

Docherty died on Thanksgiving at his home in central Pennsylvania, according to his wife, Sue Docherty.

She said her husband of 36 years had been in failing health for about three years.

“George said he was going to live to be a hundred and he was determined,” she said in a telephone interview Saturday. “It’s amazing that he was with us this long.”

Docherty, then pastor of the New York Avenue Presbyterian Church in Washington, just blocks from the White House, gave a sermon in 1952 saying the pledge should acknowledge God.

He was born in Glasgow, Scotland, and was unfamiliar with the pledge until he heard it recited by his 7-year-old son, Garth.

“I didn’t know that the Pledge of Allegiance was, and he recited it, ‘one nation, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all,'” he recalled in an interview with The Associated Press in 2004. “I came from Scotland, where we said ‘God save our gracious queen,’ ‘God save our gracious king.’ Here was the Pledge of Allegiance, and God wasn’t in it at all.”

There was little effect from that initial sermon, but he delivered it again on Feb. 7, 1954, after learning that President Dwight Eisenhower would be at the church.

The next day, Rep. Charles G. Oakman, R-Mich., introduced a bill to add the phrase “under God” to the pledge, and a companion bill was introduced in the Senate. Eisenhower signed the law on Flag Day that year.