Bitter Sweet Youth A.L.I.V.E.

lemon     

Last night, we had a bitter sweet time in Youth Alive.  I did my lemons to lemonade object lesson that I had written last year.  I won’t go into details here, but this is a link to it if you want to check it out.

http://www.sundayschoolnetwork.com/lesson_lemons.html

The last time I did this, there were only 4 kids in attendance, but last night we had 12 kids.(that’s pretty good during the summer, when it seems like everybody leaves on vacations) We had a neighbor girl from across the street that came for the first time too.  I was excited about that.  God gave me an idea for a game to play with the kids too.  Instead of “Pin the tail on the donkey”, we played “Put the problem in the Master’s hands”.  I drew a large pair of hands on a piece of paper and taped it on the garage door.  On some craft foam that has a sticky backing, I wrote some problems that kids might face. (ex. My parents are getting divorced, the class bully is picking on me, my best friend moved away, my friends’ mom has cancer, etc.) Each kid was given a problem slip.  On their turn, they would be blindfolded, spun around, and then they would try to put their problem right into the Master’s hands.  They seemed to enjoy this game.  If they could learn now to make this “game” a practice in their lives, I know they will be at a great advantage as they go on into adulthood.  God really does want us to place all our cares into His hands.

lemonade

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8 thoughts on “Bitter Sweet Youth A.L.I.V.E.

  1. Neat lesson, Carol. Object lessons work so well with kids. When I taught Poetry Lessons to 4th and 5th graders, one of the lessons was “Trying Somwehting New” (an attempt to get them to play with language in the poems they were writing). But before I gave the lesson, we offered the seeds of a pomegranate, which most of them had never tried. Many of the kids were from poorer homes. Hopefully, when they remember the objects, they will also remember the lessons.

  2. Helen,

    I would be interested to know what curriculum or methods you used for teaching 4th and 5th grade poetry. Last year, in our homeschool support group, I did a writing club for 3-6th graders. Each month we did a different type of writing.(haikus, acrostics, limericks, a partial auto-biography, and one month we wrote a shorty story using candy wrappers-that was fun).

  3. Lynnie:

    Your creativity in teaching as well as your way with expressing yourself in words and your wit never fail to amaze me. You are a wonder, Gal, and we serve a wonderful God!

    Love,
    Keek

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